A HACKING OBSESSION

Audio-book Review
By Chet Yarbrough

(Blog:awalkingdelight)
Website: chetyarbrough.blog

Ghost in the Wiresghost in the machine

3 star symbol

By Kevin Mitnick, William Simon

Narrated by Ray Porter

KEVIN MITNICK (AUTHOR, IT CONSULTANT, FORMER HACKER)
KEVIN MITNICK (Author, Computer Information Consultant, Former Hacker)—John Waters is supposed to have said, “Without obsession, life is nothing”.  Kevin Mitnick, in the span of 20 years, was convicted four times for computer hacking (exploiting computer system weaknesses).

John Waters is supposed to have said, “Without obsession, life is nothing”.  Kevin Mitnick, in the span of 20 years, was convicted four times for computer hacking (exploiting computer system weaknesses).

Mitnick’s assisted autobiography infers that hacking became Mitnick’s obsession.

“Ghost in the Wires” is a semi-believable story of an extraordinary white-collar criminal that alleges he never financially benefited from spying on people and stealing proprietary software programs from dozens of major corporations and government agencies.  His modus operandi was the lie (euphemistically called social engineering) a telephone, and a computer; all of which he used to hack.

TELEPHONE
Mitnick would “socially engineer” (lie to) company employees.  The employee would release proprietary information without understanding what they were doing.  Mitnick then used that information to steal software or spy on corporate activities.

Mitnick is a quintessential con-man.  When he chose an objective like stealing credit information from TRW or making uncharged calls on PacBell’s communication system, he would telephone the “targeted” company.  Mitnick would tell the soon-to-be-victimized; he was a company employee and needed access to their software systems to correct a problem at a branch office.

He would “socially engineer” (lie to) company contacts, who would trustingly release proprietary information.  The contact would release proprietary information without understanding what they were doing.  Mitnick then used that information to steal software or spy on corporate activities. , and allegedly, not use that information to benefit himself.  Mitnick generally criticizes Americans for being too trusting.

Mitnick obsessively researched his target.  He would learn the lingo of the corporation, identify a real employee, assume his identity, and then begin his telephone con with a person that would have access to proprietary information.  Mitnick argues that he was thrilled by the chase and the acquisition of unauthorized information.  He would store the stolen information on remote computer systems that he either hacked into or purchased as rented space.  Mitnick said he never used the information to benefit himself but only pursued it for the joy of hacking.  Really?

human research
Mitnick obsessively researched his target.  He would learn the lingo of the corporation, identify a real employee that he would become, and then begin his telephone con with a person that would have access to proprietary information.
information thief
Mitnick is obviously smart and articulate but wants a listener to believe he lived on $28,000 per year for 2 out of 10 years of life, moved cross-country at least 4 times in 8 years, lost $11,000 cash, borrowed $5,000, went to college, and never lived on the street.

Mitnick is a good story-teller but there are glaring weaknesses in his story.  Mitnick is obviously smart and articulate but wants a listener to believe he lived on $28,000 per year for 2 out of 10 years of life, moved cross-country at least 4 times in 8 years, lost $11,000 cash, borrowed $5,000, went to college, and never lived on the street.  One wonders how he lived and traveled on such a meager income; duping the world and not taking a cent of illegal gotten gains.

Mitnick seems incredibly gullible to believe one of his fellow hackers was not working for the FBI; long before he found corroborating evidence.  Mitnick seems always surprised by the betrayal of his “friends” but keeps going back to the well of friendship.  Is this personal naiveté or social engineering of those who read or listen to his story?

Finally, the competence of the FBI seems exaggerated when Mitnick is caught by a simple search done by Shimomura, a security consultant, when he found that Mitnick was somewhere in Raleigh, North Carolina.  Shimomura simply screened all telephone communication in Mitnick’s area.  Shimomura pinpointed addresses of anyone on the phone for more than 30 minutes at one time.  Mitnick was the only person that fit that criterion.

HACKING
The advent of the internet suggests hackers of the world are capable of doing considerably more damage today than when Mitnick practiced his obsession; e.g. Russian interference with the American election process.

Mitnick’s story makes one uncomfortable on two levels. One, Mitnick reveals tools used by criminals and others who can invade our privacy. And two, one wonders if he/she is being socially engineered by a consummate liar. After all, Mitnick escaped prosecution for 15 years.

The advent of the internet suggests hackers of the world are capable of doing considerably more damage today than when Mitnick practiced his obsession; i.e. Russian interference with the American election process being a prime example.

STEVE WOZNIAK
STEVE WOZNIAK

In the forward to Mitnick’s book, he is praised for his affability by Steve Wozniak (former founder of Apple). One would believe the praise is in part because of Wozniak’s belief in open system software but also because of Mitnick’s software coding expertise and suspect affability.

In Mitnick’s afterword, it appears Mitnick’s life as a criminal made him both famous and financially secure.  One wonders, how much more Mitnick could have accomplished without breaking the law.  After all, Waters implies life is something if you are obsessive.  Without doubt, Mitnick is that.

FREDERICK DOUGLASS

Audio-book Review
By Chet Yarbrough

(Blog:awalkingdelight)
Website: chetyarbrough.blog

NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

By Frederick Douglass

Narrated by Walter Covell

“Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass” is an original source of history; i.e. words written by a man ahead of his time who acted on new-found knowledge and lived to write about it.

SLAVE TREATMENT

One may question the veracity of Douglass’s words but the truth of his experience is corroborated by reports of others of his time and by America’s history of Black revolution.

Douglass was a slave in the early 19th century, 30 years before the civil war.  He became a self-taught reader/writer and scholar, reporting on himself as “a slave become free”. 

Slavery and racial prejudice are truths of American history.  Resistance is made real in Douglass’s auto biography.  Racial prejudice remains evident in today’s memory of the Watt’s riots and Black Panther movement of the 1960s.

Frederick Douglass was a canary in a coal mine that presaged the future of slavery and resistance to unequal treatment in the United States.  His experience in 1820’s Maryland is the experience of Black militancy in the 1960s.

Advances in racial equality could only be started through education.  However, Douglass infers that some level of violence is inherent in the drive for equality.  He recounts his physical resistance to the abuse of an overseer when he is near 16 years of age.  The quality of resistance seems like that of a younger brother that becomes too big to be abused by an older brother that has been able to control his sibling’s behavior. 

It is more complex in Douglass’s explanation because the overseer may also have been trying to maintain his reputation as a reformer of recalcitrant slaves.  Any hint of physical resistance would be a strike against the overseer’s reputation.

Slave Family In Cotton Field near Savannah

ca. 1860s, Near Savannah, Georgia, USA — Slave Family In Cotton Field near Savannah — Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

Douglass goes on to explain that physical abuse is only one of many ways that unequal treatment was reinforced by a white majority; e.g. slave owners refusal to educate slaves, slave owners withholding of food and clothing, slave owners sexual exploitation of slave women; more ways than can be counted, seen, or understood.

COLIN KAEPERNICK PROTEST

Douglass, like Colin Kaepernick, is not condoning violence but his story is a reality check on the consequence of resistance to unfair or unequal treatment. 

Without physical resistance, social change has no impetus, no accelerator.  Douglass did not write about murdering an oppressor.  He wrote about human equality and the need to become confident in oneself; not to be property of another but to be equally human.  The logical extension of that belief is an assertion of one’s self; i.e. a bully can only be a bully if the put-upon fail to fight back.  Douglass fought back and gained self-respect.  Short of murder, that contextualizes the Black Panther movement and reinforces the credibility of Martin Luther King’s, and today’s football player’s efforts to raise Black self-respect through education and non-violent resistance to unequal treatment.

PREACHER PREACHING

An irony that is sometimes missed in the fight for equal rights is the negative role that religion played in the unequal treatment of Blacks.

Douglass notes in his auto biography that his greatest ill-treatment stemmed from people who professed strong belief in a particular religion.  Douglass writes that be believes in God and feels blessed by God’s existence but white men and women, in Douglass’s experience, distort God’s truth through their religion to justify abhorrent behavior toward slaves.

“A Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass” is worth listening to because it gives all Americans some sense of how bad we are, how good we can be, how far we have come, and how far we have to go to eliminate racial inequality.

CREATIVE ADULT

Audio-book Review
By Chet Yarbrough

(Blog:awalkingdelight)
Website: chetyarbrough.blog

Words without Music: A Memoir

Written by: Philip Glass

Narration by:  Lloyd James

“Words without Music” is a memoir of Philip Glass’s transformation to creative adult.  This is a journey taken by every child–with greater and lesser degrees of actualized creativity. 

Glass explains how love by others transforms his life and why self-actualization is the fountain of creativity.  This is certainly not a new revelation.  Socrates, through the words of Plato, characterizes self-actualization in the dictum of “know thy self”.   Self-actualization is explained as the penultimate goal of life by Abraham Maslow.

Glass recounts his childhood with a description of his ex-Marine father, and school teacher mother.  Glass’s father is a small business entrepreneur who raises his children in a rough New York neighborhood.  Strength, determination, and adventurousness come from Glass’s father.

Glass explains how his father feared little in a neighborhood of gangs; while managing his record business with an iron hand. Glass learns how to overcome fear in working in his father’s record shop and taking the proceeds of the day to the bank at the end of the day.  Glass sees himself, as though in a mirror, when he chooses not to tell his father of a customer’s theft of a record.  Glass knows his father will act reflexively by over-zealously punishing the thief.

WOMEN AND THE LADDER TO SUCCESS

Glass describes the soul of his family as his mother.  She is the conservator, the method-of-living key to Glass’s growth as an artist. 

Glass strives to be a good student and is accepted by the University of Chicago based on academic tests rather than high school graduation.  He chooses to become a musician based on early experience as a flutist, and later as a pianist.  He finds from counseling with a Julliard alumnus that composing rather than playing music is more conducive to his innate ability.  In these pursuits, Glass’s mother is his rock, his supporter and adviser.

After graduating, Glass chooses to travel to Paris in pursuit of a composer’s education.  He is mentored by an older woman who provides the technical skill and stern loving support he needs to continue his journey toward actualization.  Glass chooses to leave his mentor with a woman of his own age and travel to India.  Glass sees himself in a way that requires reinforcement from others.  “Others” are teachers of the ancient practice of yoga.

Glass returns to America with a wife, with whom he has two children.  He lives in New York and works as a furniture mover and taxi driver while pursuing his education as a composer.  Glass is approaching thirty.  He begins to have serendipitous success.  The first big break is an opera called “Einstein on the Beac

Jean Cocteau (1889-1963, Novelist, Poet, Artist, Film Maker

Glass’s journey is symbolized by his dissection of the works of Jean Cocteau; i.e. particularly La_Belle_et_la_Bête (Beauty and the Beast).  Glass argues that Cocteau’s works are about human creativity and transformation.  The symbolism in La_Belle_et_la_Bête is the story of Glass’s life.  The rose in Cocteau’s movie symbolizes beauty (Glass’s body of work). The key is the method (Glass’s mother). The horse is strength, determination, and speed (Glass’s father). The glove is nobility (Glass’s renown as a composer). The castle is a prison that can only be escaped with love from another (Glass’s three wives, his children, his mentors, and friends). The Mirror symbolizes who you truly are (this memoir of Glass’s life).

This is a nicely written and narrated memoir of Philip Glass; considered by many as the most influential composer of the late twentieth century.

A LIFE OF DECENCY

Audio-book Review
By Chet Yarbrough

(Blog:awalkingdelight)
Website: chetyarbrough.blog

When Breath Becomes Air

Written by: Paul Kalnithi with foreword from Abraham Verghese

Narration by:  Sunil Malhotra, Cassandra Campbell

PAUL KALANITHI (AUTHOR, NEUROSURGEON)

PAUL KALANITHI (AUTHOR, NEUROSURGEON)

“When Breath Becomes Air” memorializes a disease that ravages lungs. Paul Kalanithi did not die from the Corona Virus but from a type of a cancer that attacks lung function. The Corona Virus is not a cancer. But, the Corona Virus creates an infection that simultaneously reduces our immune response. The primary organ of attack by Covid19 are lungs that cannot process air.

Paul Kalanitihi’s book seems an apt tribute to brave health care workers and others in the face of today’s Covid19 pandemic. Kalanithi writes about his life.  It is a short life, infused with stress, success, and failure.  Paul Kalnithi is the son of Indian immigrants who grows up in Kingman, Arizona.  (Kingman is a town of less than 29,000 people lying between Las Vegas luck and Phoenix senior living.)

Paul’s parents, particularly his mother, demand much from their children.  Paul is exposed to the classics of literature at an early age to supplement his private school education.  His educational interest is split between literature and science.

PAUL KALANITHI'S PARENTS (SUE, A MEDICAL PHYSIOLOGIST AND PAUL, A CARDIOLOGIST LIVE IN KINGMAN, AZ)

PAUL KALANITHI’S PARENTS (A MEDICAL PHYSIOLOGIST AND A CARDIOLOGIST LIVE IN KINGMAN, AZ)

Paul is accepted at Stanford to pursue certification as a neurosurgeon.  His motivation to become a doctor is partly based on a desire to understand the meaning of life.  If there is meaning, Paul believes it lies in the lacunae of the mind.

PAUL AND LUCY KLANITHI WITH DAUGHTER CADY

PAUL AND LUCY KLANITHI WITH DAUGHTER CADY

Within one year of Paul’s ten year journey to graduation, he is struck with lung cancer.  After a first round of treatment, Paul’s cancer is in remission and he returns to Stanford to finish his residency.

As he nears completion of residency, the cancer reasserts itself and Paul decides to write “When Breath Becomes Air” to explain what he believes about life.

There are many messages to humanity in “When Breath Becomes Air”.  It is founded on insight drawn from what Paul Klanithi has read and what he has experienced.  No life is without stress and failure.  The best one hopes for is to live and leave life as decently as Paul Kalnithi. He died at 37. He was at the peak of his career.

Every death is a tragedy to a family that has lost a loved one. America has lost over 200,000 human beings as of October 2, 2020, some famous, some not. Just last April, deaths were less than 34,000.

Alex Trebek died today, 11.8.20. He fought pancreatic cancer and filmed “Jeopardy” up until two days before his death.

Those who choose to listen to “When Breath Becomes Air” will look at life differently.  Not because of belief in God or the fallibility of human beings, but because we all live between Las Vegas luck and Phoenix senior living. 

Paul Klanithis’ memoir reminds us of those who fail to acknowledge their errors.

On October 2, 2020, President Trump and the first lady have tested positive for Covid19. Our hearts go out to the public, and now our President and first lady.

This news reminds us of the health care workers, safety officers, farmers, public employees, news reporters, grocery employees, and volunteers who risk their lives every day.

RUSSIAN REALPOLITIK

Audio-book Review
By Chet Yarbrough

(Blog:awalkingdelight)
Website: chetyarbrough.blog

Red NoticeRed Notice

Written by: Bill Browder

Narration by:  Adam Grupper

WILLIAM FELIX BROWDER (AKA BILL BROWDER-CEP AND CO-FOUNDER OF HERMITAGE CAPTIAL MANAGEMENT, NOTED CRITIC OF PUTIN)
WILLIAM FELIX BROWDER (AKA BILL BROWDER-CEP AND CO-FOUNDER OF HERMITAGE CAPTIAL MANAGEMENT, NOTED CRITIC OF PUTIN)

If only a few of Bill Browder’s facts and accusations are true, the realpolitik of Vladimir Putin shocks the senses.  “Red Notice” reflects on the diplomacy of Russian power.

In his book, “Red Notice”, Browder tells a story that implies Putin is a thug.   Browder infers that Putin will lie, steal, and murder with the brutality of Joseph Stalin, the cunning of Machiavelli, and the tenacity of Genghis Kahn.  Browder believes Putin uses his position as President to acquire wealth as second only to his desire for power.

Acquiring wealth is something Browder knows quite a lot about.  William Browder is an investment fund manager/partner who ventures into Russia at the beginning of glasnost.  Russian businesses and industries became private rather than state-owned enterprises at the end of the 20th century.

Beginning in 1996, Browder and his investors assemble a capital investment fund worth billions of dollars in 2005.  Browder began the fund with other people’s money.   The fund becomes known as Hermitage Capital Management.  As a result of his analysis, Browder’s investment group buys Russian assets at steeply undervalued prices.  He earns over two hundred million dollars per year for himself in 2006 and 2007.

BROWDER’S STORY OF HERMITAGE CAPITAL: 

In 2005, Browder is deported by the Russian government.  In 2006, Browder is black listed by the Russian government as a “threat to national security”.  In March of 2013, the bank that serves as trustee and manager of Hermitage Capital Management announces it will cease funding operations in Russia.  Browder gleefully points out in “Red Notice” that all of Hermitage Capital Management assets had been surreptitiously withdrawn in 2007.  Browder is presently being sued in absentia by the Russian Government for tax evasion.  Therein lays a tale of suspicious deaths, human greed, and conspiracy.

Browder assembles a great deal of evidence that suggests two people are murdered; that murder’ accomplices are paid a great deal of money, and that President Putin either sets the example for thuggish behavior or is complicit in a scheme that defrauds the Russian people.

DUTCH JOURNALISM’S INVESTIGATION OF THE RISE OF PUTIN:

SERGEI MAGNITSKY (1972-2009, RUSSIAN ACCOUNTANT AND AUDITOR VITIMIZED IN RUSSIA--WORKED FOR BILL BROWDER)
SERGEI MAGNITSKY (1972-2009, RUSSIAN ACCOUNTANT AND AUDITOR VITIMIZED IN RUSSIA–WORKED FOR BILL BROWDER)

The two alleged murders are Sergie Magnitsky and Alexander Perepilichnyy.  Magnitsky dies in the custody of the Russian government.  He is identified as an attorney in Browder’s book but research suggests he is not licensed as an attorney in Russia.  Magnitsky discovers a scheme by Russian government employees to recover taxes paid by Browder’s companies in Russia.  The scheme is based on charges that the companies that paid the taxes were illegally pilfered by Browder’s investment company.  The companies were transferred, without Browder’s knowledge or authorization, to shell company Russian owners.  These owners are found to be two officers in the Russian secret police.  The new owners suggest the companies they own have been pilfered and that they should be reimbursed for taxes that were paid to the government because of Browder’s fraudulent transfer of worthless assets.

Magnitsky and two Russian lawyers present evidence to the Russian government about the fraud being perpetrated by the two Russian officers.   The two Russian lawyers decide to flee their country when they believe they are going to be arrested.  Magnitsky believes facts speak for themselves; that he is safe, and the government will recognize and arrest the real criminals.  Magnitsky is arrested, beaten, and dies in prison.  The two officers, Artem Kuznetxov, and Pavel Karpov remain free.

MAJOR KARPOV EXPOSE:

ALEXANDER PEREPILICHNY (OLIGARCH THAT MAY HAVE BEEN MURDERED AT AGE 44 FOR EXPOSING RUSSIAN TAX FRAUD CASE ASSOCIATED WITH BROWDER INVESTIGATION)
ALEXANDER PEREPILICHNY (OLIGARCH THAT MAY HAVE BEEN MURDERED AT AGE 44 FOR EXPOSING RUSSIAN TAX FRAUD CASE ASSOCIATED WITH BROWDER INVESTIGATION)

Alexander Perepilichny was a Russian business man who defected from Russia in 2009.  Perepilichny dies at the front door of his residence in the UK.  Magnitsky was a forensic accountant in Russia.  Living in England in 2012, he contacts Browder to say he has evidence of how the Moscow tax office rebated taxes to the two government officials.  Browder contacts the chief constable of Surrey in England to tell them of Perepilichny’s evidence.  Browder accuses Russian officers of fraud, costing the Russian state $230 million dollars.

Three videos of the alleged fraudsters are created as evidence of the Russian officers’ fraud.  The evidence relies on their life style versus the income they receive from the Russian government.  In Browder’s book, this evidence is overlaid with the prosecution of Russian oligarchs by Putin with the inference that those oligarchs that do not offer money to Putin are at risk of being jailed.

SYNOPSIS OF THE MAGNITSKY CASE:

“Red Notice” is a powerful statement about one man’s view of Vladimir Putin.  As noted at the beginning of this review, “if only a few of Bill Browder’s facts and accusations are true…” Putin’s reputation, if not his power and wealth, are diminished.  At the same time, Browder’s ludicrously large capitalist windfall at the expense of the Russian economy, and two Russian’ deaths, does little for his reputation.

A MISOGYNIST SEA

Audio-book Review
By Chet Yarbrough

(Blog:awalkingdelight)
Website: chetyarbrough.blog

A Room of One’s Own

Written by: Virginia Woolf

Narration by:  Juliet Stevenson

VIRGINIA WOOLF (1882-1941, BRITISH AUTHOR, A WOMAN AHEAD OF HER TIME)

Virginia Woolf is a woman outside of time.   As Woolf implies in the early twentieth century, women are drowning in a misogynist sea.  Woolf is born when female inequality breaches the existential threat with a first wave; i.e. Women’s Suffrage in 1920.  The preeminent feminist, Betty Friedan, is just born (actually, 1921).  (Friedan later writes “The Feminine Mystique”–published in 1963.)

“A Room of One’s Own” is a contemplation on why women are under represented as great poets or fiction writers.  With the exception of Harriet Beecher Stowe, Woolf suggests there are no 19th century women renowned for fiction.  Apocryphally, the unlikely story of Lincoln saying “So you’re the little woman who wrote the book that made this Great War” is an apt coda for the insignificance of the public’s view of women writers.

EMILY DICKINSON (1830-1886, AMERICAN POET, PRODUCED 1,800 POEMS IN 40 HANDBOUND VOLUMES)

(As one listens to her complaint, one thinks about Emily Dickinson.  However, Dickenson did have a room of her own.)

Woolf wittily skewers male paragons of the pen and their misogynist comments about women.  She sets the table for an explanation of why there is no female Shakespeare’, erudite Johnson’, or Longfellow word smiths. 

Woolf’s point is that women had no money because they were dependent on men or family inheritance.  Often, young ladies are discouraged from college by their families who feel marriage and bearing of children are their primary duties.  Without educational support and few opportunities for gainful employment, women only had money if they inherited it or married a wealthy husband.  Without money, there is little opportunity for independence; without money, there is little chance of having “A Room of One’s Own”.

MeToo

There are many examples to support Woolf’s observation about money and the luxury of contemplation; i.e. having a room of your own.  Michel de Montaigne’s essays are spectacular observations of life and living but the key to his success is in wealth that allows him time for observation and contemplation of life.  He had a room of his own.  In Woolf’s lifetime there were few women who had such luxury.  Have things changed?  Maybe, but #MeToo suggests women’s independence and wealth still involves misogyny.

In the last section of her lecture Woolf notes women write fiction with a mixture of public disdain and admiration.  Disdain from implied colorlessness in writing but admiration for a twist in a story that suggests a first-time female author has potential.

MISOGYNY

Misogyny still roils the sea but more women writers have a room of their own.  The second wave is forty years in the future but Friedan steadies the helm-bearing toward equality.  At $.79 cents to the dollar in the 21st century, there is still a long way to go.

However, for realization of potential, Woolf suggests the author needs to have a room of her own to have time to think and reflect.  To prove Woolf’s bona fides, she ends “A Room of Her Own” with short stories.  They are beautifully written and worthy of the theme of which she writes. 

As Aristotle once said, contemplation is the highest form of activity for the soul.  Woolf implies great literature; great fiction, and poetry come from authors who have time and a room of their own.

CREATIVE ADULT

Audio-book Review
By Chet Yarbrough

(Blog:awalkingdelight)
Website: chetyarbrough.blog

Words without Music: A MemoirWords without Music

Written by: Philip Glass

Narration by:  Lloyd James

PHILIP GLASS (AMERICAN COMPOSER)
PHILIP GLASS (AMERICAN COMPOSER)

“Words without Music” is a memoir of Philip Glass’s transformation to creative adult.  This is a journey taken by every child–with greater and lesser degrees of actualized creativity.  Glass explains how love by others transforms his life and why self-actualization is the fountain of creativity.  This is certainly not a new revelation.  Socrates, through the words of Plato, characterizes self-actualization in the dictum of “know thy self”.   Self-actualization is explained as the penultimate goal of life by Abraham Maslow.

Glass recounts his childhood with a description of his ex-Marine father, and school teacher mother.  Glass’s father is a small business man who raises his children in a rough New York neighborhood.  Strength, determination, and adventurousness come from Glass’s father.

PHILIP GLASS (WITH HIS FATHER, A RECORD STORE OWNER, WHO SENT HIS SON TO HIGH-END MUSIC SCHOOLS)
PHILIP GLASS (WITH HIS FATHER, A RECORD STORE OWNER, WHO SENT HIS SON TO HIGH-END MUSIC SCHOOLS)

The soul of Glass’s family is his mother.  She is the conservator, the method-of-living key to Glass’s growth as an artist.  Glass explains how his father feared little in a neighborhood of gangs; while managing his record business with an iron hand.

Glass learns how to overcome fear in working in his father’s record shop and taking the proceeds of the day to the bank at the end of the day.  Glass sees himself, as though in a mirror, when he chooses not to tell his father of a customer’s theft of a record.  Glass knows his father will act reflexively by overzealously punishing the thief.

women are the sun
WOMEN ARE THE SUN, THE SOURCE OF ENERGY AROUND WHICH MEN REVOLVE.    (In Glass’s  pursuits, he notes that his mother is his rock, his supporter and adviser.)

Glass strives to be a good student and is accepted by the University of Chicago based on academic tests rather than high school graduation.  Glass chooses to become a musician based on early experience as a flutist, and later as a pianist.  He finds from counseling, from a Julliard alumnus, that composing music rather than playing music is more conducive to his innate ability.  In these pursuits, Glass’s mother is his rock, his supporter and adviser.

After graduating, Glass chooses to travel to Paris in pursuit of a composer’s education.  He is mentored by an older woman who provides the technical skill and stern loving support he needs to continue his journey toward actualization.  Glass chooses to leave his mentor with a woman of his own age and travel to India.  Glass sees himself in a way that requires reinforcement from others.  “Others” are teachers of the ancient practice of yoga.

PHILIP GLASS AND HIS FAMILY IN 1973
PHILIP GLASS AND HIS FAMILY IN 1973

Glass returns to America with a wife, with whom he has two children.  He lives in New York and works as a furniture mover and taxi driver while pursuing his education as a composer.  Glass is approaching thirty.  He begins to have serendipitous success.  The first big break is an opera called “Einstein on the Beach”.

JEAN COCTEAU (1889-1963, NOVELIST, POET, ARTIST, FILM MAKER)
JEAN COCTEAU (1889-1963, NOVELIST, POET, ARTIST, FILM MAKER)

Glass’s journey is symbolized by his dissection of the works of Jean Cocteau; i.e. particularly La_Belle_et_la_Bête (Beauty and the Beast).  Glass argues that Cocteau’s works are about human creativity and transformation.  The symbolism in La_Belle_et_la_Bête is the story of Glass’s life.  The rose in Cocteau’s movie symbolizes beauty (Glass’s body of work). The key is the method (Glass’s mother). The horse is strength, determination, and speed (Glass’s father). The glove is nobility (Glass’s renown as a composer). The castle is a prison that can only be escaped with love from another (Glass’s three wives, his children, his mentors, and friends). The Mirror symbolizes who you truly are (this memoir of Glass’s life).

This is a nicely written and narrated memoir of Philip Glass; considered by many as the most influential composer of the late twentieth century.

ARE YOU BLACK ENOUGH

Audio-book Review
By Chet Yarbrough

(Blog:awalkingdelight)
Website: chetyarbrough.blog

Negroland: A Memoir

Written by: Margo Jefferson

Narration by:  Robin Miles

MARGO JEFFERSON (AUTHOR, FORMER THEATRE CRITIC FOR NYT, PULIZER PRIZE WINNER FOR CRITICISM, PROFESSOR @ EUGENE LANG COLLEGE)

Margo Jefferson’s memoir is a perspective on growing up in America.  Jefferson is born in 1947.  She is raised in Chicago by two professional middle class parents; i.e. one is a doctor; the other a teacher.  What makes Jefferson’s memoir interesting is her middle class upbringing.  It sharply defines answers to many questions never asked by Americans.

Are you black enough?  Are you white enough?  Are you female enough?  Are you male enough?  Are you American enough? 

MARGO JEFFERSON (CLASS OF '71 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GRADUATE)
MARGO JEFFERSON (CLASS OF ’71 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY GRADUATE)

Jefferson wrestles with many of the same baby to teenage insecurities all Americans face in their generation.  However, there is an extra layer of complexity for Jefferson because of her color.  Jefferson lightly touches on the history of slavery and its societal consequence but she personalizes that history in explaining how she became Margo Jefferson, an accomplished theatre critic and professor.

Chicago is a microcosm of America.  Discrimination, crime, poverty, and failure in equality of opportunity are the same in Chicago neighborhoods as anywhere in America. 

MARGO JEFFERSON AS CHEERLEADER IN THE 60'S (CENTER, TOP ROW)

What Jefferson does in “Negroland” is explain how American society makes her life different because of her color.

Like most girls and boys in high school, Jefferson wants to be popular.  She tries to become a cheerleader.  With success in her senior year, she wonders about the reasons for it taking so long.  Is it because she is not pretty enough?  Is it because she is nearsighted and has astigmatism?  Or, is it because she is not white enough?

RACISM

Jefferson recalls her family’s trip to Atlantic City for a doctor’s conference.  Reservations were made but when they arrive, the hotel gives the family a poorly appointed room and suggests the restaurant would be off-limits for dining.  They checked out of the hotel the next morning.

Jefferson notes concerns of her mother about how other people of color talk and act while warning her daughter not to emulate their speech or style.  Jefferson becomes aware of the potential stigma of not being black enough among people who are proud to be black.

Jefferson explains how she becomes best friends with a handsome gay white man and revels in the looks black men give that seem to question her interest in being with a white man when she is black.  At the same time, she notes how beautiful women hit on her friend without understanding that he has no interest in them.

LARRY WILMORE (COMEDIAN AND SOCIAL CRITIC)

In listening to Jefferson’s memoir the day after Larry Wilmore’s routine about Obama at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner, one gains better insight to Wilmore’s send-up of President Obama.  Wilmore is unfairly criticized for his tart-tongued stand-up when thought of in light of Jefferson’s memoir.

The last part of Wilmore’s presentation seriously praises Obama’s accomplishment and then uses a pejorative word for black Americans to categorize Obama.  Wilmore’s comment is badly interpreted by some.  Wilmore is saying Obama is great enough to be both the President of the United States (in the sense of acceptance by all Americans) and black enough (in the sense of being accepted by blacks).

Jefferson’s memoir, and Wilmore’s routine shows that being American enough, black enough, white enough, male or female enough, is just being a part of the human race.

SYMBOL OF WOMEN’S RIGHTS

Audio-book Review
By Chet Yarbrough

(Blog:awalkingdelight)
Website: chetyarbrough.blog

I Am Malala

Written by: Malala Yousafzai

Narrated by: Archie Panjabi

Malala Yousafzai may be narrowly identified as a symbol of women’s rights. That categorization is certainly earned but one is left wondering what will become of this young woman.

Malala lives the life of an old soul–advocating for equal rights at eleven years old and being nearly murdered at 15.   Malala will be 23 years old this July, 2020.

SWAT VALLEY IN PAKISTAN

As most know, Malala is shot in the head by two young Taliban who attacked her school bus in the Swat Valley of Pakistan.  We know they were Taliban because they acknowledged responsibility soon after the attack.

Miraculously, the bullet did not penetrate Malala’s brain but bone fragments from the shock of impact severed a facial nerve and temporarily paralyzed most of her motor functions.

BRAIN RULES

Dr. John J. Medina explains how unbelievably versatile the human brain is by recounting experiences of people who have been severely injured. 

Some recover many of the functions formally managed by parts of the brain that have been damaged.  John Medina notes that eyes do not see; i.e. the brain is the functional source of sight.  He explains the miraculous feats of the brain that manipulate the scenes of life.

Malala is rushed to a hospital in Pakistan and is saved from immediate danger by a competent Pakistani neurosurgeon.  The world is apprised of the attempted assassination and sends messages of support for Malala’s recovery.  In “I Am Malala”, a listener finds that after-care in Pakistan nearly ends Malala’s chance for survival.

MALALA (SHOT AND HOSPITALIZED)

MALALA (SHOT AND HOSPITALIZED)

Somewhat ironically, Great Britain comes to Malala’s aid.  The irony is in the long history of Great Britain’s colonization of Malala’s homeland.  There is historical justification for India/Pakistani’ ambivalence toward the West.  “I Am Malala” touches on that ambivalence.  However, Malala recognizes how important Great Britain’s assistance was in saving her life.

DRONE ATTACK

Malala reminds listeners of the lost lives of her countryman from American drone strikes and the invasion of Pakistani air space; including military action to kill Osama bin Laden. 

On the one hand, Malala shows embarrassment over bin Laden’s successful sanctuary in Pakistan; on the other, she implies America should have worked with the Pakistani government to capture the world’s most notorious terrorist.  There is a whiff of resentment in Malala’s depiction of the West’s treatment of her country but it is ameliorated by her principled stand for education, equal opportunity, and Pakistan’ sovereignty.

MALALA YOUSAFZAI (NOBEL PRIZE, SAKHAROVE PRIZE, SIMONE de BEAUVOIR PRIZE, NATIONAL YOUTH PRIZE WINNER)

MALALA YOUSAFZAI (NOBEL PRIZE, SAKHAROVE PRIZE, SIMONE de BEAUVOIR PRIZE, NATIONAL YOUTH PRIZE WINNER)

“I Am Malala” shows a young girl with great resilience and ambition.  One is left with the impression that Malala will return to Pakistan.  She will attempt to become a leader in her home country.

The message one gets from her book is that Pakistan is a great and beautiful country that can be a partner with the West as an independent and Islamic nation.  Malala is a politician in waiting.  One hopes for her success.